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Nicholas DeFelice

Assistant Professor

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Nicholas DeFelice, PhD, is Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and a member of the Mount Sinai Institute for Exposomic Research. Dr. DeFelice studies the environmental determinants of infectious disease transmission. He develops mathematical models that quantify the burden of disease attributable to poor infrastructure and other environmental exposures, along with systems to forecast infectious disease outbreaks. His current research focuses on forecasting West Nile virus outbreaks. More broadly, his research is addressing how climate change influences human health and the environmental solutions that can promote positive health outcomes. Dr. DeFelice holds a PhD in Environmental Science and Engineering at the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he also completed his Master of Science in Environmental Engineering. Prior to joining Mount Sinai, his postdoctoral training was completed at Columbia University with a focus on climate and health.

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Papers

Fiore VG, DeFelice N, Glicksberg BS, Perl O, Shuster A, Kulkarni K, O'Brien M, Pisauro MA, Chung D, Gu X. (2021). Containment of COVID-19: Simulating the impact of different policies and testing capacities for contact tracing, testing, and isolation. PloS one, 16(3)

Carrión D, Colicino E, Pedretti NF, Arfer KB, Rush J, DeFelice N, Just AC. (2021). Neighborhood-level disparities and subway utilization during the COVID-19 pandemic in New York City. Nature communications, 12(1)

Keyel AC, Gorris ME, Rochlin I, Uelmen JA, Chaves LF, Hamer GL, Moise IK, Shocket M, Kilpatrick AM, DeFelice NB, Davis JK, Little E, Irwin P, Tyre AJ, Helm Smith K, Fredregill CL, Elison Timm O, Holcomb KM, Wimberly MC, Ward MJ, Barker CM, Rhodes CG, Smith RL. (2021). A proposed framework for the development and qualitative evaluation of West Nile virus models and their application to local public health decision-making. PLoS neglected tropical diseases, 15(9)

Carrión D, Colicino E, Pedretti NF, Arfer KB, Rush J, DeFelice N, Just AC. (2020). Assessing capacity to social distance and neighborhood-level health disparities during the COVID-19 pandemic. medRxiv : the preprint server for health sciences

Fiore VG, DeFelice N, Glicksberg BS, Perl O, Shuster A, Kulkarni K, O'Brien M, Pisauro MA, Chung D, Gu X. (2020). Containment of future waves of COVID-19: simulating the impact of different policies and testing capacities for contact tracing, testing, and isolation. medRxiv : the preprint server for health sciences

DeFelice NB, Birger R, DeFelice N, Gagner A, Campbell SR, Romano C, Santoriello M, Henke J, Wittie J, Cole B, Kaiser C, Shaman J. (2019). Modeling and Surveillance of Reporting Delays of Mosquitoes and Humans Infected With West Nile Virus and Associations With Accuracy of West Nile Virus Forecasts. JAMA network open, 2(4)

DeFelice NB, Schneider ZD, Little E, Barker C, Caillouet KA, Campbell SR, Damian D, Irwin P, Jones HMP, Townsend J, Shaman J. (2018). Use of temperature to improve West Nile virus forecasts. PLoS computational biology, 14(3)

DeFelice NB, Little E, Campbell SR, Shaman J. (2017). Ensemble forecast of human West Nile virus cases and mosquito infection rates. Nature communications, (8)

DeFelice NB, Johnston JE, Gibson JM. (2016). Reducing Emergency Department Visits for Acute Gastrointestinal Illnesses in North Carolina (USA) by Extending Community Water Service. Environmental health perspectives, 124(10)

DeFelice NB, Johnston JE, Gibson JM. (2015). Acute Gastrointestinal Illness Risks in North Carolina Community Water Systems: A Methodological Comparison. Environmental science & technology, 49(16)

MacDonald Gibson J, Thomsen J, Launay F, Harder E, DeFelice N. (2013). Deaths and medical visits attributable to environmental pollution in the United Arab Emirates. PloS one, 8(3)

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