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between urban raccoons and domestic dogs.

Abstract

Antimicrobial resistant bacteria (ARB) have been detected in numerous wildlife species across the globe, which may have important implications for human and animal health. Wildlife can be exposed to ARB via numerous pathways, including via spatial overlap with domestic animals. However, the interface with domestic animals has mostly been explored for livestock and little is known about the interface between wild animals and companion animals. Our work suggests that urban and suburban wildlife can have similar ARB to local domestic dogs, but local dogs are unlikely to be a direct source of exposure for urban-adapted wildlife. This finding is important because it underscores the need to incorporate wildlife into antimicrobial resistance surveillance efforts, and to investigate whether certain urban wildlife species could act as additional epidemiological pathways of exposure for companion animals, and indirectly for humans.

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