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Comparison of e-cigarette use prevalence and frequency by smoking status among youth in the United States, 2014-2019.

Abstract

116,704 students from 1,268 schools, ages 9-19.

Students self-reported (paper 2014-2018, electronic 2019) ever and past 30-day (current) use of e-cigarettes and cigarettes, as well as frequent use (20-30 days of month).

From 2014-2018, current e-cigarette use prevalence increased among never, current and former smokers in HS, but only among never and current smokers in MS (each p-value<0.001). E-cigarette use increases for current HS smokers were primarily among frequent e-cigarette users. In 2018, the absolute number of HS frequent users who were never or former smokers (420,000 combined) surpassed current smokers (370,000). In 2019, current e-cigarette use prevalence for never, former, and current smokers was 17.5% (95% CI: 16.0-19.0), 53.6% (95% CI: 45.2-61.9), and 85.8% (95% CI: 81.6-89.9) for HS students, respectively, and 6.8% (95% CI: 5.9-7.7), 40.8% (95% CI: 34.7-47.0), and 78.0% (95% CI: 71.9-84.2) for MS students. That year, the number of HS never (420,000) and former smokers (570,000) using e-cigarettes frequently eclipsed that of current smokers (390,000).

Nationally representative, cross-sectional, school-based survey (National Youth Tobacco Surveys (NYTS)). General linear models accounting for complex survey design compared e-cigarette use prevalence by smoking status by year, overall and stratified by frequency, separately for high school (HS) and middle school (MS) students. The 2019 survey was analyzed separately because of its change in survey methodology.

E-cigarette use prevalence and frequency among youth vary by smoking status, with highest levels of use among current smokers. However frequent e-cigarette use among never smokers and former smokers has increased.

Reports of youth e-cigarette use often do not disaggregate by underlying smoking status. This study compared annual 2014-2019 youth estimates of past 30-day e-cigarette use prevalence and frequency by smoking status in the United States (US).

MSs and HSs in the US.

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Citation:

Tam J, Brouwer AF. (2021). Comparison of e-cigarette use prevalence and frequency by smoking status among youth in the United States, 2014-2019. Addiction (Abingdon, England)