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Office manager and nurse perspectives on facilitators of adult immunization.

Abstract

Sampled patients were most frequently female (61%) and white (83%), and averaged 76 years of age. Weighted vaccination rates were 61.1% for PPV and 52.5% for influenza; rates varied by practice. Using HLM, with patient age and race entered as level 1 variables and office factors entered as level 2 variables, time allotted for an annual well visit was associated with a higher likelihood of influenza vaccination (odds ratio [OR] = 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02, 1.07; P = .003). Nurse influenza vaccination status was associated with a higher likelihood of PPV vaccination (OR = 3.81; 95% CI = 1.49, 9.78; P = .009).

In an intentional sample of 18 primary care practices, PPV and influenza vaccination rates were determined for a sample of 2289 patients >or=65 years old using medical record review. Office managers and lead nurses were surveyed about their office systems for providing adult immunizations, beliefs about PPV and influenza vaccines, and their own vaccination status. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analyses were used to account for the clustered nature of the data.

In addition to race and age, visit length and the nurses' vaccination status were associated with adult vaccination rates. Quality improvement initiatives for adult vaccination might include strengthening social influence of providers and/or ensuring that adequate time is scheduled for preventive care.

To assess which characteristics of primary care practices serving low- to middle-income white and minority patients relate to pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) and influenza vaccination rates.

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Citation:

Nowalk MP, Tabbarah M, Hart JA, Fox DE, Raymund M, Wilson SA, Zimmerman RK, . (2009). Office manager and nurse perspectives on facilitators of adult immunization. The American journal of managed care, 15(10)