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Quantitative assessment of the benefits of specific information technologies applied to clinical studies in developing countries.

Abstract

Clinical studies and trials require accessibility of large amounts of high-quality information in a timely manner, often daily. The integrated application of information technologies can greatly improve quality control as well as facilitate compliance with established standards such as Good Clinical Practice (GCP) and Good Laboratory Practice (GLP). We have customized and implemented a number of information technologies, such as personal data assistants (PDAs), geographic information system (GIS), and barcode and fingerprint scanning, to streamline a pediatric dengue cohort study in Managua, Nicaragua. Quantitative data was obtained to assess the actual contribution of each technology in relation to processing time, accuracy, real-time access to data, savings in consumable materials, and time to proficiency in training sessions. In addition to specific advantages, these information technologies benefited not only the study itself but numerous routine clinical and laboratory processes in the health center and laboratories of the Nicaraguan Ministry of Health.

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Citation:

Avilés W, Ortega O, Kuan G, Coloma J, Harris E. (2008). Quantitative assessment of the benefits of specific information technologies applied to clinical studies in developing countries. The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene, 78(2)