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The prevalence of trichomoniasis in young adults in the United States.

Abstract

Trichomoniasis is moderately prevalent among the general U.S. population of young adults and disturbingly high among certain racial/ethnic groups.

The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) is an ongoing prospective cohort study. In a cross-sectional analysis of Wave III of Add Health (N = 12,449), we determined the prevalence of trichomoniasis using a polymerase chain reaction assay.

The estimated overall prevalence of trichomoniasis in U.S. young adults was 2.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8-2.7%). The prevalence was slightly higher among women (2.8%; 95% CI, 2.2-3.6%) than men (1.7%; 95% CI, 1.3-2.2%). The prevalence increased with age and varied by region, with the south having the highest prevalence (2.8%; 95% CI, 2.2-3.5%). The prevalence was highest among black women (10.5%; 95% CI, 8.3-13.3%) and lowest among white women (1.1%; 95% CI, 0.8-1.6%). Among men, the prevalence was highest among Native Americans (4.1%; 95% CI, 0.4-29.3%) and blacks (3.3%; 95% CI, 2.2-4.9%), and lowest among white men (1.3%; 95% CI, 0.9-1.8%).

The prevalence of trichomoniasis in the general population of the United States is unknown. This study provides the first population-based prevalence estimates of trichomoniasis among young adults in the United States.

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