Close

Elucidating mechanisms of invasion success: effects of parasite removal on growth and survival rates of invasive and native frogs.

Abstract

. Although Cuban treefrogs have a lower diversity of parasitic worms in their invasive than native range, this does not appear to significantly contribute to their invasion success in areas where they have been established for more than 20 years. This suggests that any manipulation of parasites in invasive or native hosts would not be an effective method of controlling Cuban treefrogs or reducing their impacts. Further research into other hypotheses is needed to explain the Cuban treefrog's success and help guide management actions to reduce their spread and negative impacts. Our study demonstrates that enemy release may not be a primary driver of invasiveness, highlighting the need for more experimental tests of the enemy release hypothesis to examine its generality.

MIDAS Network Members

Citation:

Roznik EA, Surbaugh KL, Cano N, Rohr JR. (2020). Elucidating mechanisms of invasion success: effects of parasite removal on growth and survival rates of invasive and native frogs. The Journal of applied ecology, 57(6)

This site is registered on wpml.org as a development site.