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Mitigating the Risk of Infectious Diseases Among Rural Drug Users in Western North Carolina: Results of the Southern Appalachia Test, Link, Care (SA-TLC) Health Care Provider Survey.

Abstract

We collected data on practice characteristics, provider sociodemographics, and attitudes and beliefs about hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), opioid use, and IDU via online survey. Providers in 8 counties of western NC were invited to participate by email. Results were analyzed using descriptive and bivariate statistics.

Our findings provide insights to inform health infrastructure improvement, with the goal of preventing HCV or HIV outbreaks in southern Appalachia. Rural health care workers are willing to receive additional training if it can improve care for patients affected by substance use disorders.

Of 84 respondents participating between 30 July and 3 December 2018, 81% were practicing clinicians and 46% served a county identified as being vulnerable to IDU-associated outbreaks of HCV or HIV. A substantial proportion was unsure about injecting behaviors among patients. Scores reflected comfort working with opioid users, though this varied by medical specialty. One-quarter of respondents "never" discussed harm reduction or HCV treatment with patients known to inject drugs; 22% "never" discussed HIV screening with injectors; and 1 in 3 referred at-risk patients out for HCV or HIV testing rather than ordering a test themselves. Scores indicated low levels of stigma toward persons living with HCV or HIV. Respondents identified HIV treatment, HCV treatment, and liver disease management as training needs.

To characterize how health care providers in western North Carolina (NC) manage patients with substance use disorders and to inform strategies for preventing injection drug use (IDU)-associated outbreaks of bloodborne infectious diseases.

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