Close

Sexual role and transmission of HIV Type 1 among men who have sex with men, in Peru.

Abstract

In Latin America, men who have sex with men (MSM) have traditionally practiced role segregation--that is, the adoption of a fixed role (insertive or receptive) rather than a versatile role (both practices) during anal sex. Previous modeling has shown that role segregation may yield a lower incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection, compared with role versatility; however, the modeling assumed no risk of acquiring HIV-1 during insertive sex, which is now recognized as unlikely. We reexamine the issue by use of a deterministic model incorporating bidirectional transmission and data from a cohort study of MSM in Lima, Peru, to demonstrate the potential effects of role segregation on the trajectory of the HIV-1 epidemic. In Lima, 67% of MSM reported segregated roles in their recent male partnerships. A population of MSM with identical contact rates but complete role versatility would have twice the prevalence of HIV-1 infection throughout the epidemic's first 3 decades. Preferential mixing among versatile MSM does not change overall prevalence but affects which individuals become infected.

MIDAS Network Members

Citation: